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Demographics/MD_CensusBoundaries (MapServer)

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Service Description: Census Blocks are statistical areas bounded on all sides by visible features, such as streets, roads, streams, and railroad tracks, and/or by nonvisible boundaries such as city, town, township, and county limits, and short line-of-sight extensions of streets and roads. Census blocks are relatively small in area; for example, a block in a city bounded by streets. However, census blocks in remote areas are often large and irregular and may even be many square miles in area. A common misunderstanding is that data users think census blocks are used geographically to build all other census geographic areas, rather all other census geographic areas are updated and then used as the primary constraints, along with roads and water features, to delineate the tabulation blocks. As a result, all 2010 Census blocks nest within every other 2010 Census geographic area, so that Census Bureau statistical data can be tabulated at the block level and aggregated up to the appropriate geographic areas. Blocks are the smallest geographic areas for which the Census Bureau publishes data from the decennial census. Block Groups (BGs) are defined before tabulation block delineation and numbering, but are clusters of blocks within the same census tract that have the same first digit of their 4-digit census block number from the same decennial census. Census 2010 BGs generally contained between 600 and 3,000 people, with an optimum size of 1,500 people. Most BGs were delineated by local participants in the Census Bureau's Participant Statistical Areas Program (PSAP). The primary purpose of census tracts is to provide a stable set of geographic units for the presentation of census data and comparison back to previous decennial censuses. Census tracts generally have a population size between 1,200 and 8,000 people, with an optimum size of 4,000 people. When first delineated, census tracts were designed to be homogeneous with respect to population characteristics, economic status, and living conditions. Census tract boundaries generally follow visible and identifiable features. State and county boundaries always are census tract boundaries in the standard census geographic hierarchy. In a few rare instances, a census tract may consist of noncontiguous areas.

Map Name: Layers

Legend

All Layers and Tables

Dynamic Legend

Dynamic All Layers

Layers: Description:

Copyright Text: MD iMAP, MDP, U.S. Census

Spatial Reference: 102100  (3857)


Single Fused Map Cache: false

Initial Extent: Full Extent: Units: esriMeters

Supported Image Format Types: PNG32,PNG24,PNG,JPG,DIB,TIFF,EMF,PS,PDF,GIF,SVG,SVGZ,BMP

Document Info: Supports Dynamic Layers: true

MaxRecordCount: 65000

MaxImageHeight: 4096

MaxImageWidth: 4096

Supported Query Formats: JSON, geoJSON

Min Scale: 0

Max Scale: 0

Supports Datum Transformation: true



Child Resources:   Info   Dynamic Layer

Supported Operations:   Export Map   Identify   QueryDomains   QueryLegends   Find   Return Updates   Generate KML

Supported Extensions:   MDiMAPDataDownload